New Zealanders Don’t Trust MPs, Bloggers, or the Media

 New Zealanders don’t trust MP’s, bloggers, or the media

The mainstream media has achieved a new historic milestone lately: Only 6% Americans trust them, which means 94% are now asking relevant questions that are pushing them away from the lies and deceptions that mainstream media are all about.

Trust in the news media is being eroded by perceptions of inaccuracy and bias, fueled in part by Americans’ skepticism about what they read on social media.

Just 6 percent of people say they have a lot of confidence in the media, putting the news industry about equal to Congress and well below the public’s view of other institutions. In this presidential campaign year, Democrats were more likely to trust the news media than Republicans or independents.

But trust today also goes beyond the traditional journalistic principles of accuracy, balance and fairness.

Faced with ever-increasing sources of information, Americans also are more likely to rely on news that is up-to-date, concise and cites expert sources or documents, according to a study by the Media Insight Project, a partnership of The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the American Press Institute.

They want to be able to navigate the news app or website easily and quickly, without having to wade through intrusive or annoying ads.

“The skill set that journalists have to master is bigger,” said Tom Rosenstiel, executive director of the American Press Institute. That’s because the expectations of news consumers have increased.

The poll shows that accuracy clearly is the most important component of trust.

Nearly 90 percent of Americans say it’s extremely or very important that the media get their facts correct, according to the study. About 4 in 10 say they can remember a specific incident that eroded their confidence in the media, most often one that dealt with accuracy or a perception that it was one-sided.

The news media have been hit by a series of blunders on high-profile stories ranging from the Supreme Court’s 2012 ruling on President Barack Obama’s health care law to the Boston Marathon bombing that have helped feed negative perceptions of the media.

Download the survey results and analysis from here.

The establishment is definitely feeling the crunch as of late. But, they are still in control of the system, and they are still rigging it.


A New York City elections official has been suspended without pay after a bureaucratic error allegedly resulted in the removal of over 100,000 Brooklyn voters’ names from the city rolls during the state’s presidential primary, according to a report.

Sources told the Daily News that Borough Office Chief Clerk Diane Haslett-Rudianoshe skipped one of the steps meant to stop the system from purging eligible voters.

The voting books need to be purged from time to time to eliminate people who pass away, move to new locations or become ineligible for other reasons. This eventually resulted in voters being improperly removed.

She was suspended “without pay, effective immediately, pending an internal investigation into the administration of the voter rolls in the Borough of Brooklyn,” the city’s Board of Elections (BOE) reportedly said in a statement.

RT

This disenfranchisement of 100,000 voters was claimed to have tip the balance towards Clinton’s favor.

So, not only that both parties are owned and controlled by the same puppet masters, the process of selecting party candidates itself is also a game of survival of the fittest.

And as the masses are fully entertained by this periodic game of musical chairs, the Western economy is left burning without the mainstream media telling like it is.

They’re not only in utter denial, but they are wary more of their own irrelevance as the internet-based alternative media is now virtually certified as the new mainstream media.

Humanity has definitely achieved something significant right here. And we can still achieve more if we continue to work together in spite of our cultural differences.

Trust This: New Zealanders Don’t Trust MPs, Bloggers, The Media

New Zealanders are trusting politicians less and less, according to a new survey. Just 8 percent of people questioned said they trusted MPs, while government ministers edged up towards 9 percent.

The survey, carried out by Colmar Brunton for Victoria University’s Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, asked 1000 people across the country about their confidence in government ministers, academics, judges, churches and the media, among others.

Medical practitioners scored highest with 56 percent trusting them “lots” or “completely”, followed by police (53 percent). Judges and courts had a 34 percent rating.

But there was little faith in politicians, nor in media, with print and broadcast media at 9 percent, and last on the list, bloggers, trusted by 5 percent in the survey.

Not only do people have little trust in their elected officials, they’re trusting them less.

The survey showed trust in MPs and government ministers fell over the last three years more than any other group, with 58 percent saying they trust them less.

ACT party leader David Seymour said the survey was concerning, though not surprising.


“”It was already starting from a low base, so that is very disappointing.”

New Zealand First leader Winston Peters said once politicians get into parliament, they forgot the people who elected them.


“Many MPs are living evidence that New Zealanders can take a joke. You’ve seen their behaviour – their egregious, self-serving behaviour [and] the fact they get outside their electorate and forget their people.”

Green Party co-leader James Shaw said politicians tended to come across as a “self-interested political class” who had “nothing better to do than throw insults at each other.

In order to fix that image, the processes in Parliament needed to change.


“The way that we examine bills breaks the process down in such a way that MPs, they show up, they make a five-minute speech and they go away again. That is clearly not a real debate.
There are some things that the Speaker can do to lift standards of behaviour [and] I think we should have a code of ethics for politicians and political operators that is way more rigorous than the one we currently have.”

Institute for Governance and Policy Studies director, Professor Michael Macaulay, said the rankings offered a snapshot of the current political climate, which was “typified by low voter turn out and a public largely disengaged with politics.”

The survey revealed numbers but did not go into the reasons for people’s lack of confidence, and he wanted it to be used as a basis for further research.

From: Geopolitics / AP / RadioNewZealand